Parvo Disease In Humans

Parvovirus - encyclopedia article - Citizendium

What Should You Do If Your Dog Gets Parvo

Dreaded as it may seem, there are dog parvo treatments that you can use at home. However, if your dog doesn't have the necessary immunization from this disease and the puppy is quite young, you are better off taking your dog to the vet because the disease can really be critical. It has complications that you want to be addressed fast because if not, your dog would definitely suffer so much from it.

Right now, there are parvo treatment medicines available at pet care centers. While this seems to be the more practical choice, you really have to consider your dog's condition before opting for it. It is always best to take your pet to the vet first and let the expert evaluate your dog. Depending on the outcome of the diagnosis, you can choose between giving your dog home care and leaving it to the vet for hospitalization.

If in case you really can't afford the medical bills, you can address dog parvo at home by first making sure that your dog doesn't get dehydrated. Dehydration is caused by diarrhea, which is a prominent symptom of this disease. More often than not, dogs die from it and not because of the virus itself. Hydrate your puppy or dog by giving it free access to water mixed with Gatorade at all times. Gatorade contains electrolytes that can save your pet from dehydration. Unflavored Pedialyte, which is a medicine used for babies, can be used alternately. It would also help to give your dog some broth or soup for food.

About the author: Want to learn more about parvo virus in dogs? On ParvoInDogs.Com you can find articles about parvo dealing with the main symptoms, parvo prevention methods and about Parvaid, one of the most popular treatments for the dog parvo virus.

Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/pets-articles/what-should-you-do-if-your-dog-gets-parvo-796274.html


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  5. Dog Disease Parvo

14 Responses to “Parvo Disease In Humans”

  1. NESHA_4_YA says:

    can humans get infected with the parvo disease from dogs?
    my puppies i think have parvo, they are in the house right now…do they need togo outside, so that me and others that live in the house wont catch it.

    but can human get parvo?

  2. Angela M says:

    Can Human Parvo disease cause severe pain for 2 years?
    I’ve been in pain for 2+ years, possible liver tumor which doc says “might not be there” and “shouldn’t cause pain” as if i’m imagining pain that has kept me bed ridden 3-5 days a week. I now have 5 docs working on me and none of them know why I’m in pain. I feel like I’m walking around with a knife in my abdomen all day every day. Percocet only dulls the pain. (I wish I could cut part of my abdomen out with a razor blade it hurts sooooo bad!) And now I found out I have human parvo virus but I don’t know if it is the cause of this misery. Anyone heard of such a thing???

  3. studiousprofessor says:

    You need to get them to a vet ASAP if you havent or they are going to die. No you can’t catch parvo.

  4. falconjet66 says:

    Does anyone know of a person who has been diagonosed with human parvo?
    My deceased husband was diagnosed with human parvo in 2004. He was also diagnosed with CLL in 2000. He became lukiemia free and 3 months later passed. On the death certificate it states human parvo. Not many case are known but how does a person get this disease? I just don’t quite understand it.

  5. Ryan says:

    I’ve only heard of parvo disease for dogs. My dog contracted it when she was a pup and almost died. After her recovery her temperment really changed for the worse.

    maybe this link will help: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/revb/respiratory/parvo_b19.htm

  6. BRITTANIA says:

    Our puppy just came home from the hospital for parvo, is he carrying a disease humans can get?
    Our dog was in the hospital for 6 days hooked up to an I.V. My husband went to visit him, & they came out with our Anikin. He still is weak, & very tired. Could we contract anything from him? Could he get it again?

  7. KuyumcuS says:

    I am a genetic scientist ı am currently working in a diangnostic laboratory. We have a HPV test. Generally HPV can be seen in the cervics of Woman. However it is contagious virus so it can be seen in the man also. So most probably you have HPV or he had a sexual relationship with other woman.(sorry for this possibility)
    You can ask additional questions to me via e-mail.

  8. kenzsmommy says:

    Can humans catch hookworms (or other worms ) or parvo from dogs or can humans catch any diseases from cats?
    Which diseases are more common in dogs
    and more common in cats—Is it more common for dogs to have hookworms than cats
    are any diseases more prominent in dogs and not so common in cats???
    ok so then how was someone that i know recently diagnosed with human parvo and told that he prolly caught from his dog ?!?!? Is this REALLY possible or is this doctor wrong?!

  9. Allanas says:

    Worms – yes.

    Parvo – no

    Each species does have parasites and diseases they are more susceptible to, but entire text books have been written about it. I just don’t have enough time or energy to type an entire text book in this little box. LOL!

    Read these sites. It gives a good over view about zoonosis and how to prevent spreading sickness.

    http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/brochures/ZoonoticDisease.html
    http://www.growingupwithpets.com/worms/en/zoonosis.shtml

  10. Stark says:

    Humans can not get parvo, it is a virus specific to canines. You are very lucky he survived it! This disease is very deadly to puppies. I’m sure it is possible that he could get it again, but not probable. Just keep his area clean. Clean up all his stool, wash his blankets, clean the house alot. Try to keep him germ free. And call you vet if you want to be sure that he won’t get it again. And once he is healthy enough, GET HIM VACCINATED! That is the Best way to protect him from this disease again, and other diseases.

  11. roxanne says:

    My boyfriends dog we think had parvo and she died, but he gave her cpr just before she died can he get parvo disease for doing that, because his mouth was on hers?

  12. Admin says:

    Roxanne,

    We’re sorry to hear about your boyfriend’s dog.

    However, there is no need to worry about him getting Parvo – the Canine Parvovirus cannot be contracted by humans (although other animals, including cats, can become infected).

  13. roxanne says:

    Thank u so much I feel re leaved about that now, one more question, because I was in there home,and went home 2 my own animals can humans be a carrier? Because I have 2 cats at home and they are very old, just scared I could have taken it with me home, cing that it can stay in your area for up 2 1 year, because they do have another dag at home should we be concerned, and if catched early enough can they be cured and what would be the first symptoms, again thank u for replying

  14. Admin says:

    Roxanne,

    You’re welcome.

    Firstly, yes, humans can carry the virus – it can stick to your clothes, your shoes and, of course, you skin (particularly your hands). We therefore recommend changing shoes whenever you go inside your house, and being really aware of hygiene – warm/hot soapy water before and after handling any animals.

    Secondly, Parvo can be treated successfully (in both dogs and cats), and the sooner you start treatment, the better the chance of a positive outcome.

    Typically, the first symptoms you’ll see will be behavioural changes, most notably a lack of appetite and not wanting to play. This is usually followed by vomiting, diarrhea (which is almost always foul smeling and often bloody), dehydration, depression, and fever or chills.

    However, not all dogs and cats get all of these symptoms, and they don’t always appear in the same order.

    It’s because Parvo can strike out of the blue that we always recommend having a Parvo Treatment Kit on hand, then if the worst does happen, you can begin treatment immediately.

    This is especially important for people who live outside of North America, as international shipping can take too long if your dog or cat is already sick. Within the US, we only use FedEx Overnight shipping if an animal already has Parvo, but the fastest international services can still take anywhere from three to five days, which is too long to wait with a virus such as this.

    The other advantage of ordering before you actually need the products is that you can choose a slower and therefore cheaper shipping method, which can save a bit of money.

    If you’re interested in being as prepared as you can be, then you can find out what you need on this site: http://www.ParvoEmergencyTreatment.com/